AHGP Transcription Project


Osage County



Osage County, in the central part of the State, is bounded north by the Missouri River, which separates it from Callaway, east by Gasconade, south by Maries, and west by Miller County and the Osage River, which separates it from Cole, and contains 375,336 acres.

Population, in 1850, 6,704; in i860, 7,879; in 1870, 10,793, of whom 10,467 were white, and 326 colored; 5,641 male, and 5,152 female; 8,392 native (6,888 born in Missouri) and 2,401 foreign.

History
The first settlements were made by Germans and emigrants from the Eastern States. The county was organized from Gasconade January 29th, 1841, and named for the Osage River.

Physical Features
The Missouri and Osage Rivers lie on the entire northwestern boundary, and have numerous tributaries. Bailey, Shawnee, Deer and Cedar Creeks find their way to the Missouri; Maries and Sugar Creeks are affluents of the Osage. The southeastern part is watered by the Gasconade and a few small tributary creeks. The general character of the country is uneven, and some portions broken and sterile. The valleys are exceedingly fertile, and much of the table land will produce good crops. The timber consists of oak, hickory, black walnut, etc., and saw mills might do well on the Gasconade, Osage or Maries.

The Agricultural Productions are wheat, corn, rye, tobacco and barley. Rye, hemp, flax, broom corn, sorghum, sweet potatoes, buckwheat, white or navy beans, all do well in favorable seasons. There are but few cultivated pastures in the county, and these do not succeed well, excepting in very wet seasons. Blue grass pastures are generally parched during the summer. The orchards planted on the south hillsides and on the ridges produce well, not being subject to the attack of the borer. Some attention has been given to grape culture and with marked success; about 50 acres are now bearing, and the fruit is of fine flavor and makes excellent wine. Improved breeds of hogs and cattle have been introduced and are paying well.

Mineral Resources
Osage County is believed to be rich in iron and lead, but no mines have been developed.

The Manufacturing Interests consist of 6 steam saw mills and 4 flouring mills.

Wealth
Valuation of the county per census of 1870, $3,000,000.*

Railroads
The Missouri Pacific Rail Road has 25 miles of road following the course of the Missouri River.

The Exports are wheat, tobacco, barley and stock.

Educational Interests
Public schools are established in nearly every sub-district, and there is a growing interest in the schools, evidenced by the improved school houses, furniture and apparatus.

Osage County Places in 1875

Bailey's Creek, is a post office 8 miles north east of Linn.

Boeger's Store, is a post office 6 1/2 miles east north east of Linn.

Bonnot's Mills, See Dauphine.

Byrne, is a post office 15 miles south east of Linn.

Castle Rock, on the Osage River, 15 miles west of Linn, has 1 grist mill and 1 store.

Chamois, on the Missouri River and on the Missouri Pacific Rail Road, 100 miles from St. Louis, has 6 stores, a number of shops, and is a growing town.

Cooper Hill, on the Gasconade River, 11 miles south east of Linn, has 3 stores, several shops and 2 hotels.

Dauphine, (Bonnot's Mills), on the Missouri River and on the Missouri Pacific Rail Road, 112 miles from St. Louis, has 2 stores and one grist mill.

Fredericksburgh, 14 miles north east of Linn, has 1 store and 1 mill.

Gallaway Station, is a post office 16 miles south east of Linn.

Koeltztown, 16 miles south west of Linn, has 1 store and 1 wagon shop.

Kiddridge, is a post office 7 1/2 miles east of Linn.

LINN, the county seat, 10 miles south east of Bonnot's Mills, has 3 stores, 1 mill, 2 hotels, 1 saddler and 1 wagon maker.

Linnwood, 10 miles east of Linn, has 1 mill and 1 store.

Loose Creek, is 3 miles north west of Linn.

Medora, (St. Aubert's Station), on the Missouri River and on the Missouri Pacific Rail Road, 20 miles east of Jefferson, is a post office 11 miles north of Linn.

Mint Hill, is a post office 8 miles north east of Linn.


*Assessed valuation for 1873, $2,256,586.



Source: Campbell's Gazetteer of Missouri, Revised Edition, by R. A. Campbell, Published by R. A. Campbell,
St. Louis, Missouri, 1875




Be sure to add us to your favorites list and check back often.

This page was last updated Friday, 22-Jan-2016 11:15:49 EST.

Webspace for this site is generously provided by
    and


Information contained on this website may be used for personal genealogical research only and not to be given to pay to view sites or used on any other web site without the express consent of the contributor.

Copyright © 2015~2017 by Paula Franklin & Judy White